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    The Future Of The US Navy’s DDG(X) Is Being Shaped By Advanced Hypersonic Missiles And High-energy Lasers

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    The United States Navy has been at the forefront of naval warfare evolution, constantly upgrading and introducing new vessels to maintain dominance in the world’s oceans. At the intersection of advanced technology and military might, the Navy unveiled its ambitious vision for the future—the DDG(X) warship. As a next-generation guided-missile destroyer, the DDG(X) concept promises unparalleled firepower, survivability, and versatility to meet 21st-century threats.

    SAN DIEGO (Dec. 8, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) arrives at its new homeport in San Diego. Zumwalt, the Navy’s most technologically advanced surface ship, will now begin installation of combat systems, testing and evaluation and operation integration with the fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Emiline L. M. Senn/Released)161208-N-OR184-0044

    In a detailed presentation, the Navy laid out the capabilities of the DDG(X), designed to replace the current fleet of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and continue the legacy of maritime superiority. The DDG(X) is planned for construction in 2028 and has been tailored to ensure that the United States retains its edge in an increasingly competitive geopolitical landscape.

    CHANGI NAVAL BASE, Singapore (May 14, 2019) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) sits pierside at Changi Naval Base in Singapore. William P. Lawrence is in Singapore participating in the 2019 International Maritime Defense Exhibition (IMDEX). The U.S. Navy has participated in IMDEX for decades to promote multilateral dialogue, enhance security cooperation and support regional stability as part of a free and open Indo-Pacific. IMDEX also provides U.S. Navy participants an opportunity to deepen longstanding friendships with the people and armed forces of Singapore. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Patrick Semales/Released) 190514-N-VA840-0003

    Equipped with the power to fire hypersonic missiles, the DDG(X) represents a leap in offensive capabilities. “Initially, the ship would feature a 32-cell Mk-41 Vertical Launch System forward of the superstructure that could be swapped for 12 larger missile cells capable of fielding the Pentagon’s emerging hypersonic weapons,” as per the detailed outlook of the ship.

    MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 24, 2022) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98), top, sails alongside the Spanish navy çlvaro de Baz‡n-class frigate Almirante Juan de Borb—n (F-102) during a passing exercise in the Mediterranean Sea. Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) is the flagship for Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2), a multinational integrated task group that projects a constant and visible reminder of the AllianceÕs solidarity and cohesion afloat and provides the Alliance with a continuous maritime capability to perform a wide range of tasks, including exercises and real-world operations in periods of crisis and conflict. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ezekiel Duran) 220824-N-DH616-2058

    The DDG(X) is not just about missiles; it’s also poised to harness the power of directed energy weapons. Lasers with ten times the power of current naval laser systems are in development, aiming to provide an effective defense against a range of threats, including hostile guided missiles. These high-energy weapons, requiring immense power, highlight the need for a warship with a formidable energy generation and distribution system.

    The guided-missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) transits the Chesapeake Bay on its way back into port. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class RJ Stratchko/Released)

    The Navy’s embrace of an Integrated Power System is key to the DDG(X)’s design, with power generation focused not just on propulsion but also on the ship’s advanced combat systems. This centralized power approach will provide flexibility to reallocate energy based on real-time operational requirements, ensuring the most efficient use and enabling the integration of future combat capabilities.

    Improved survivability is another cornerstone of the DDG(X) design. With features enhancing its range and ability to operate in the Arctic, the new destroyer class will be able to project power in environments that have historically been challenging for naval operations. This forward-thinking approach to design ensures that the DDG(X) will not only be a formidable force in temperate waters but also a capable asset in the planet’s most extreme conditions.

    030329-N-6141B-005 Central Command’s area of Responsibility (Mar. 29, 2003) — The guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) conducts underway operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Arleigh Burke was one of many U.S. Navy surface combatants to fire Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, the multi-national coalition effort to liberate the Iraqi people, eliminate IraqÕs weapons of mass destruction, and end the regime of Saddam Hussein. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Journalist Alan J. Baribeau. (RELEASED)

    CBO estimated DDG(X) would have an average cost of between $3.2 billion and $3.5 billion, while the Navy’s estimate was between $2.3 billion and $2.4 billion in the 2023 shipbuilding plan, the report said.

    The United States Navy’s vision for the DDG(X) is a testament to its commitment to innovation and preparedness. As it moves towards a future where hypersonic missiles and high-powered lasers become mainstays of naval warfare, the DDG(X) stands as a beacon of American naval power and technological prowess.

    related images you might be interested.

    030520-N-0295M-008 At sea with USS Milius (DDG 69) May 20, 2003 — The guided missile destroyer USS Milius (DDG 69) proudly displays her large American flag during a practice sea power demonstration for USS Constellation’s upcoming ÒTiger Cruise.Ó USS Constellation (CV 64) Carrier Strike Force is returning home from deployment in which it supported Operations Southern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain. (RELEASED)
    The US Navy (USN) Destroyer USS SPRUANCE (DD 963) cruises the Atlantic Ocean preparing for an early underway replenishment as part of COMBINED JOINT TASK FORCE (CJTF) Exercise.

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